National Journal

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#Pennsylvania


Why Is Pennsylvania’s Governor Suing the NCAA?By Naureen Khan
With his approval ratings languishing in the 30s and the Penn State scandal one of the major albatrosses hanging around his neck ahead of his re-election campaign, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett’s decision to file a federal lawsuit contesting the NCAA sanctions is viewed by his detractors as a last ditch attempt to rehabilitate his image in a state where the university still holds considerable cultural currency.
(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)


Why Is Pennsylvania’s Governor Suing the NCAA?

By Naureen Khan

With his approval ratings languishing in the 30s and the Penn State scandal one of the major albatrosses hanging around his neck ahead of his re-election campaign, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett’s decision to file a federal lawsuit contesting the NCAA sanctions is viewed by his detractors as a last ditch attempt to rehabilitate his image in a state where the university still holds considerable cultural currency.

(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

On This Date in 1777—and Only This Date—Lancaster, Penn., Was the Capital of the United States

mentalflossr:

© Richard T. Nowitz/CORBIS

If you’ve visited Lancaster, Penn., you probably remember it as a nice mid-sized city right in the heart of Pennsylvania’s Amish country. What you might not know is that 235 years ago today, it became our young country’s third capital city, a position it held only briefly. Very, very briefly. Let’s take a look at how Lancaster became our capital for a single day.

History, y’all.