Friday, November 30, 2012
As President Obama decides who will succeed Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., might get the short end of the stick once more.

Created by: Matt Vasilogambros & Rachel Fauber 

As President Obama decides who will succeed Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., might get the short end of the stick once more.


Created by: Matt VasilogambrosRachel Fauber 

Thursday, April 12, 2012
I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas, but what I decided to do was to fulfill my profession, which I entered before my husband was in public life.

Hillary Clinton while her husband was running for president.

Candidate Spouses Not Immune to Trail Scrutiny

Happening now on our homepage: comparing Ann Romney to 1992 Hillary Clinton.

Happening now on our homepage: comparing Ann Romney to 1992 Hillary Clinton.

Thursday, April 5, 2012
Well. This is my new obsession.

Well. This is my new obsession.

Wednesday, January 18, 2012
PHOTO OF THE DAY: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton laughs after receiving a Los Angeles Lakers basketball jersey as a gift from global cultural ambassador and former NBA basketball star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Wednesday at the State Department in Washington. Abdul-Jabbar will travel the world to engage a generation of young people to help promote diplomacy. (PHOTO: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton laughs after receiving a Los Angeles Lakers basketball jersey as a gift from global cultural ambassador and former NBA basketball star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Wednesday at the State Department in Washington. Abdul-Jabbar will travel the world to engage a generation of young people to help promote diplomacy. (PHOTO: Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Thursday, December 1, 2011
PHOTO OF THE DAY: Myanmar President Thein Sein, right, shakes hands with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a meeting at the President’s Office in Naypyidaw, Myanmar on Thursday. (PHOTO: Saul Loeb, Pool/AP)

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Myanmar President Thein Sein, right, shakes hands with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a meeting at the President’s Office in Naypyidaw, Myanmar on Thursday. (PHOTO: Saul Loeb, Pool/AP)

Monday, June 27, 2011
PHOTO OF THE DAY: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gestures during a event co-hosted by the State Department and Gays and Lesbians in Foreign Affairs Agencies (GLIFAA) at the State Department on Monday. During the event Secretary Clinton was presented with the GLIFAA Equality Award. (PHOTO: MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES)

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gestures during a event co-hosted by the State Department and Gays and Lesbians in Foreign Affairs Agencies (GLIFAA) at the State Department on Monday. During the event Secretary Clinton was presented with the GLIFAA Equality Award. (PHOTO: MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES)

Monday, April 11, 2011
PHOTO OF THE DAY: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton shakes hands with Finnish Foreign Minister Cai-Goran Alexander Stubb during a joint press availability on Monday at the State Department. Clinton had a meeting with Stubb to discuss bilateral issues. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

PHOTO OF THE DAY: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton shakes hands with Finnish Foreign Minister Cai-Goran Alexander Stubb during a joint press availability on Monday at the State Department. Clinton had a meeting with Stubb to discuss bilateral issues. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Statement by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

"Gerry Ferraro was one of a kind — tough, brilliant, and never afraid to speak her mind or stand up for what she believed in — a New York icon and a true American original. She was a champion for women and children and for the idea that there should be no limits on what every American can achieve. The daughter of an Italian immigrant family, she rose to become the first woman ever nominated to the national ticket by a major political party. She paved the way for a generation of female leaders and put the first cracks in America’s political glass ceiling. She believed passionately that politics and public service was about making a difference for the people she represented as a congresswoman and Ambassador.

For us, Gerry was above all a friend and companion. From the rough-and-tumble of political campaigns to the important work of international diplomacy, we were honored to have her by our side. She was a tireless voice for human rights and helped lead the American delegation to the landmark Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995. Through it all, she was a loyal friend, trusted confidante, and valued colleague.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Gerry’s husband John, her children and grandchildren, and their entire family.”

Sunday, March 13, 2011

STATEMENT BY SECRETARY CLINTON: Resignation of Philip J. Crowley

It is with regret that I have accepted the resignation of Philip J. Crowley as Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs. PJ has served our nation with distinction for more than three decades, in uniform and as a civilian. His service to country is motivated by a deep devotion to public policy and public diplomacy, and I wish him the very best. Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (PDAS) Michael Hammer will serve as Acting Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs.

STATEMENT BY PHILIP J. CROWLEY

The unauthorized disclosure of classified information is a serious crime under U.S. law. My recent comments regarding the conditions of the pre-trial detention of Private First Class Bradley Manning were intended to highlight the broader, even strategic impact of discreet actions undertaken by national security agencies every day and their impact on our global standing and leadership. The exercise of power in today’s challenging times and relentless media environment must be prudent and consistent with our laws and values.

Given the impact of my remarks, for which I take full responsibility, I have submitted my resignation as Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs and Spokesman for the Department of State.

I am enormously grateful to President Obama and Secretary Clinton for the high honor of once again serving the American people. I leave with great admiration and affection for my State colleagues, who promote our national interest both on the front lines and in the quiet corners of the world. It was a privilege to help communicate their many and vital contributions to our national security. And I leave with deep respect for the journalists who report on foreign policy and global developments every day, in many cases under dangerous conditions and subject to serious threats. Their efforts help make governments more responsible, accountable and transparent.